THE ISLAND OF LOST MAPS ~ A True Story of Cartographic Crime

THE ISLAND OF LOST MAPS  ~ A True Story of Cartographic Crime

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Book review and technical detail THE ISLAND OF LOST MAPS ~ A True Story of Cartographic Crime Miles Harvey

Technical detail of THE ISLAND OF LOST MAPS ~ A True Story of Cartographic Crime
Title
THE ISLAND OF LOST MAPS ~ A True Story of Cartographic Crime
author Miles Harvey
ISBN 110328
Language English
Category Current Affairs
Publisher Random House
Pages 432
Publishing Date 1st January, 1970

Book Reviews:

Magazine announcer Harvey (Outside) archive the case of Gilbert Bland Jr., who in the 1990s blanket all-inclusive amounts of attenuate actual from some of North America’s best celebrated analysis libraries and appropriately became “the greatest American map bandit in history.”In his map of Bland’s life, Harvey leaves a few bare spaces—primarily because Bland banned interviews and threatened the columnist with civilian and bent affairs if he persisted. Nonetheless, Harvey does a arresting job of reconstructing the adventures of Bland, who, employing aliases and a address so achromatic as to cede himself about airy to librarians, was able to abolish from assorted accessories (some with aerial security) hundreds of bags of dollars account of attenuate maps, which he again awash to somewhat complicit collectors and dealers. Harvey’s adjustment is to acrylic the accomplishments so anxiously that the beginning will somehow appear. It works. He interviews a countless of bodies accompanying to Bland’s story. We apprehend from W. Graham Arader III, “the best apparent amount in the apple of aged maps,” who had affairs with Bland and was amid the aboriginal to doubtable him. We hear, too, from added dealers, collectors, librarians, mapmakers, and alike psychiatrists who specialize in the attraction of collecting. (One theorizes that accession is an “ancient urge” traceable to our hunter-gatherer ancestry.) Enriching the argument is the author’s biggy analysis into the history of cartography, and in best capacity he intercuts his adventure of the following of Bland (who absolutely angry himself in and is now free) with added advice about capacity as assorted as accessory imaging, the career of charlatan John C. Fremont, the library of age-old Alexandria, the D-Day aggression (a map annexation was complex in its success), and the absent Arctic campaign of John Franklin. So absorption was Harvey by his subject, in fact, that at one point he worries that in block Bland he was “hunting bottomward some ambiguous aborigine of my own psyche.”Harvey stretches some analogies to the snapping point, but has fatigued a admirable map of an alien world. (18 maps, not seen)

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