SWINGIN' THE DREAM ~ Big Band Jazz and the Rebirth of American Culture

SWINGIN' THE DREAM  ~ Big Band Jazz and the Rebirth of American Culture

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Book review and technical detail SWINGIN' THE DREAM ~ Big Band Jazz and the Rebirth of American Culture Lewis A. Erenberg

Technical detail of SWINGIN' THE DREAM ~ Big Band Jazz and the Rebirth of American Culture
Title
SWINGIN' THE DREAM ~ Big Band Jazz and the Rebirth of American Culture
author Lewis A. Erenberg
ISBN 107482
Language English
Category Entertainment & Sports
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Pages 344
Publishing Date 1st January, 1970

Book Reviews:

Erenberg (History/Loyola Univ.) picks up the history of American accepted ability area he larboard off at the end of his antecedent book, Steppin’ Out: NY Nightlife and the Transformation of American Ability (not reviewed). From the average of the 1930s through the aboriginal years of the postwar period, the alleged beat era, American accepted music was bedeviled by the complete of the big bands, both applesauce bands and “sweet” bands. For the aboriginal time in the history of American accepted culture, African-American forms came to the fore, and the success of big-band applesauce fabricated it possible, admitting with ample difficulty, for some musicians to advance a beat ancestral affiliation on the bandstand and alike in the audience. At the aforementioned time, Erenberg argues, beat helped animate a potentially corrupt adolescence culture, blooming in the ’20s but aged by the bread-and-butter realities of the Depression. A aggregate of forces, decidedly the abolition of Prohibition and the acceleration of radio, fabricated the abrupt celebration of beat possible. And a abrupt celebration it was—the war and the amusing armament it unleashed, the Red alarm of the post—WW II era and a alternation of accelerated socioeconomic changes bedevilled the big bands. This adventure has been told abounding times before, and Erenberg does accomplish some cogent contributions to adorning the picture, best conspicuously in his casual focus on admirers acknowledgment and participation. But all-embracing this is a broken and generally repetitive accumulating of essays. Moreover, the book is bedridden by abundant errors, such as advertence “Bidin’ My Time” to Hoagy Carmichael. The best arrant error, however, credibility up the above antecedent of its failure. Erenberg repeats the account that Bessie Smith “died as a aftereffect of allegory in medical facilities.” Recent scholarship has disproved this version. A assay of his footnotes reveals that while Erenberg is abreast in his own bookish field, he has bootless to accumulate up with the abstract of jazz. A black and, frankly, rather dully accounting effort. (32 b&w photos, not seen)

During the 1930s, swing bands combined jazz and popular music to create large-scale dreams for the Depression generation, capturing the imagination of America's young people, music critics, and the music business. Swingin' the Dream explores that world, looking at the racial mixing-up and musical swinging-out that shook the nation and has kept people dancing ever since."Swingin' the Dream is an intelligent, provocative study of the big band era, chiefly during its golden hours in the 1930s; not merely does Lewis A. Erenberg give the music its full due, but he places it in a larger context and makes, for the most part, a plausible case for its importance."—Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post Book World"An absorbing read for fans and an insightful view of the impact of an important homegrown art form."—Publishers Weekly"[A] fascinating celebration of the decade or so in which American popular music basked in the sunlight of a seemingly endless high noon."—Tony Russell, Times Literary Supplement

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