WHY DID THE CHICKEN CROSS THE WORLD? ~ The Epic Saga of the Bird that Powers Civilization

WHY DID THE CHICKEN CROSS THE WORLD?  ~ The Epic Saga of the Bird that Powers Civilization

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Book review and technical detail WHY DID THE CHICKEN CROSS THE WORLD? ~ The Epic Saga of the Bird that Powers Civilization Andrew Lawler

Technical detail of WHY DID THE CHICKEN CROSS THE WORLD? ~ The Epic Saga of the Bird that Powers Civilization
Title
WHY DID THE CHICKEN CROSS THE WORLD? ~ The Epic Saga of the Bird that Powers Civilization
author Andrew Lawler
ISBN 91113
Language
Category Entertainment & Sports
Publisher Atria Books
Pages 336
Publishing Date 1st January, 1970

Book Reviews:

The appellation tells all in this absolute annual of how an anti-social south Asian fowl became the world’s admired food.Today, there are added than 20 billion chickens, an amazing number, admits Lawler, a accidental biographer for Science magazine and freelance journalist. “Add up the world’s cats, dogs, pigs, and beasts and there would still be added chickens,” writes the author. Wondering how it is that such a bird has become so all-over in so abounding manifestations (from McNuggets to application Col. Sanders’ buckets), the columnist boarded on an ballsy adventure of his own to libraries and universities (where he interviewed assorted authorities on the bird), cockfights in the Philippines, the jungles of Vietnam, the branch farms now processing the birds for accumulation consumption, and the beastly rights activist who keeps but does not eat her chickens. Lawler additionally takes readers on a cruise into abysmal history, assuming us the accustomed history of the bird, the difficulties archaeologists accept with them (their basic do not generally survive continued sojourns in the ground), and the religious acceptation of, especially, the rooster. Lawler advised the craven carcasses that Darwin studied, and he quotes a Hamlet sentry who mentions a rooster. He tells about some long-ago uses of bird parts—e.g., the dung of a banty could cure an abscessed lung. We apprentice about weathervanes and how the bird has been roosting in our language: “chicken” (coward), “cock” (well, you know) and others. The columnist instructs us about craven animal unions and about the intricacies of the egg, and he eventually arrives at the moral question: Why do we amusement these birds with such abstruse cruelty? He additionally acknowledges that chickens’ decay and demands on our assets are annihilation like those of pigs and cows. A baroque book abounding of affected biking and analysis in history, mythology, archaeology, biology, abstract and religion.

From ancient empires to modern economics, veteran journalist Andrew Lawler delivers a sweeping history of the animal that has been most crucial to the spread of civilization across the globe—the chicken.Queen Victoria was obsessed with it. Socrates’ last words were about it. Charles Darwin and Louis Pasteur made their scientific breakthroughs using it. Catholic popes, African shamans, Chinese philosophers, and Muslim mystics praised it. Throughout the history of civilization, humans have embraced it in every form imaginable—as a messenger of the gods, powerful sex symbol, gambling aid, emblem of resurrection, all-purpose medicine, handy research tool, inspiration for bravery, epitome of evil, and, of course, as the star of the world’s most famous joke. In Why Did the Chicken Cross the World?, science writer Andrew Lawler takes us on an adventure from prehistory to the modern era with a fascinating account of the partnership between human and chicken (the most successful of all cross-species relationships). Beginning with the recent discovery in Montana that the chicken’s unlikely ancestor is T. rex, this book builds on Lawler’s popular Smithsonian cover article, “How the Chicken Conquered the World” to track the chicken from its original domestication in the jungles of Southeast Asia some 10,000 years ago to postwar America, where it became the most engineered of animals, to the uncertain future of what is now humanity’s single most important source of protein. In a masterful combination of historical sleuthing and journalistic exploration on four continents, Lawler reframes the way we feel and think about our most important animal partner—and, by extension, all domesticated animals, and even nature itself. Lawler’s narrative reveals the secrets behind the chicken’s transformation from a shy jungle bird into an animal of astonishing versatility, capable of serving our species’ changing needs. For no other siren has called humans to rise, shine, and prosper quite like the rooster’s cry: “cock-a-doodle-doo!”

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