THE BOY WHO CRIED FREEBIRD ~ Rock and Roll Fables and Sonic Storytelling

THE BOY WHO CRIED FREEBIRD  ~ Rock and Roll Fables and Sonic Storytelling

Get the book from following Links

Ebay Link
Amazon Link

Book review and technical detail THE BOY WHO CRIED FREEBIRD ~ Rock and Roll Fables and Sonic Storytelling Mitch Myers

Technical detail of THE BOY WHO CRIED FREEBIRD ~ Rock and Roll Fables and Sonic Storytelling
Title
THE BOY WHO CRIED FREEBIRD ~ Rock and Roll Fables and Sonic Storytelling
author Mitch Myers
ISBN 92398
Language
Category Entertainment & Sports
Publisher It Books
Pages 336
Publishing Date 1st January, 1970

Book Reviews:

A sci-fi abbreviate adventure starring the Grateful Dead, a ardent admiration to applesauce giants Art Blakey and Thelonious Monk, a tall-tale about a apparitional Robert Johnson tune and 39 added bite-sized chunks of mostly appetizing agreeable goodness.Many of the finest music writers are a tad humorless. Robert Christgau, for example, can be massively cranky, while Peter Guralnick can be massively staid. So back a amusing accumulating of music fiction and criticism comes along, it’s account advantageous attention, if alone because the funniest music book of all time, Lester Bangs, is, you know, dead. (This camp bouillon has the flavor of Bangs’s work, spiced with a smidgen of Nick Hornby and a compression of Philip K. Dick.) A active freelance journalist, Myers appears consistently on All Things Considered, and a cardinal of the abrupt essays in his admission were ahead heard on NPR. The best “fables,” on the added hand, are new. In the best memorable of them, Adam Coil V campaign 100 years through time “Back to the Fillmore” for a 1969 Grateful Asleep gig; he parties with the Hell’s Angels, loses his virginity to a hippie banty alleged “Cinnamon Girl” and basks in the sounds of adolescent Jerry Garcia. Playing Black Sabbath music unmasks human-seeming aliens in addition cool highlight, “Who Will Save the World?” While the book is aimed at rock-’n’-roll nuts, the best absorbing beeline journalism is jazz-oriented, accurately the above Blakey/Monk commodity and a addicted accolade to saxophonist Albert Ayler. Analyses of Lou Reed, Frank Zappa and Doug Sahm are solid, if unspectacular journalistic pieces that anemic back nestled beside the added active and aboriginal fiction. Had Myers concentrated on storytelling, he ability accept beyond over to a added audience. As it is, his book will be admired by music nerds but alone accepted (at best) by accidental music fans.Periodically smashing, periodically pedestrian.

Wedding the American oral storytelling tradition with progressive music journalism, Mitch Myers' The Boy Who Cried Freebird is a treatise on the popular music culture of the twentieth century. Trenchant, insightful, and wonderfully strange, this literary mix-tape is authentic music history . . . except when it isn't. Myers outrageously blends short fiction, straight journalism, comic interludes, memoirs, serious artist profiles, satire, and related fan-boy hokum—including the classic stories he first narrated on NPR's All Things Considered.Focusing on iconic recordings, events, communities, and individuals, Myers riffs on Deadheads, sixties nostalgia, rock concert decorum, glockenspiels, and all manner of pop phenomena. From tales of rock-and-roll time travel to science fiction revealing Black Sabbath's power to melt space aliens, The Boy Who Cried Freebird is about music, culture, legend, and lore—all to be lovingly passed on to future generations.

Reviews of THE BOY WHO CRIED FREEBIRD ~ Rock and Roll Fables and Sonic Storytelling written by Mitch Myers. You can submit your own review to admin@reviewbooks.online. Suggestions be welcome.

― Admin-reviewbooks.Online
Add Comment
;