FAMILY PROPERTIES ~ Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America

FAMILY PROPERTIES  ~ Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America

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Book review and technical detail FAMILY PROPERTIES ~ Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America Beryl Satter

Technical detail of FAMILY PROPERTIES ~ Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America
Title
FAMILY PROPERTIES ~ Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America
author Beryl Satter
ISBN 90393
Language
Category Current Affairs
Publisher Metropolitan Books
Pages 512
Publishing Date 1st January, 1970

Book Reviews:

An absorbing attending at the history of racist real-estate practices in Chicago, and the activists who fought for justice.Satter (History/Rutgers Univ.; Each Mind a Kingdom: American Women, Sexual Purity, and the New Thought Movement, 1875–1920, 1999) angle this affair through the claimed lens of ancestors history. Her ancestor was a civil-rights advocate who represented abounding atramentous families adjoin arrant real-estate affairs in the 1950s and ’60s. Taking advantage of the actuality that few banks would accord mortgages to African-Americans, owners pushed a arrangement alleged “contract selling,” which was basically a high-interest chapter plan with absonant account payments. The houses were generally in busted and grossly overpriced; antecedent bottomward payments were massive. One backward account acquittal accustomed the buyer to abandoned the contract, adios the tenants and alpha the action afresh with addition family. Alike if they managed to break afloat financially, atramentous families generally had to argue with hostile, alike violent, white neighbors. Satter writes of one air-conditioned case in 1957, back a mob of 200 teenagers aggregate alfresco an African-American homeowner’s house, chanting, “We appetite blood.” Back they approved redress in the courts, plaintiffs generally met action from aboveboard racist judges. Subsequent capacity characterize the campaigns for amusing amends that arose from these practices. The columnist profiles Chicago activists like association organizer Saul Alinsky, who organized pickets adjoin landlords, and movements such as the Arrangement Buyers League, which in the backward ’60s and aboriginal ’70s spearheaded acquittal strikes and auspiciously challenged the amends of Illinois’s boot law. Much of the book’s additional bisected chronicles convolute attorneys struggles; it’s a attestation to Satter’s accomplishment that these sections are amid the best arresting and at times apprehend like a acknowledged thriller. Abounding of the problems and injustices she writes about still abide today, and she does an accomplished job of documenting and answer them for the lay reader.Comprehensive and compulsively readable.

Part family story and part urban history, a landmark investigation of segregation and urban decay in Chicago—and cities across the nationThe "promised land" for thousands of Southern blacks, postwar Chicago quickly became the most segregated city in the North, the site of the nation’s worst ghettos and the target of Martin Luther King Jr.’s first campaign beyond the South. In this powerful book, Beryl Satter identifies the true causes of the city’s black slums and the ruin of urban neighborhoods throughout the country: not, as some have argued, black pathology, the culture of poverty, or white flight, but a widespread and institutionalized system of legal and financial exploitation. In Satter’s riveting account of a city in crisis, unscrupulous lawyers, slumlords, and speculators are pitched against religious reformers, community organizers, and an impassioned attorney who launched a crusade against the profiteers—the author’s father, Mark J. Satter. At the heart of the struggle stand the black migrants who, having left the South with its legacy of sharecropping, suddenly find themselves caught in a new kind of debt peonage. Satter shows the interlocking forces at work in their oppression: the discriminatory practices of the banking industry; the federal policies that created the country’s shameful "dual housing market"; the economic anxieties that fueled white violence; and the tempting profits to be made by preying on the city’s most vulnerable population. A monumental work of history, this tale of racism and real estate, politics and finance, will forever change our understanding of the forces that transformed urban America.

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