ALL THOSE MORNINGS . . . AT THE POST ~ The 20th Century in Sports from Famed Washington Post Columnist Shirley Povich

ALL THOSE MORNINGS . . . AT THE POST  ~ The 20th Century in Sports from Famed Washington Post Columnist Shirley Povich

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Book review and technical detail ALL THOSE MORNINGS . . . AT THE POST ~ The 20th Century in Sports from Famed Washington Post Columnist Shirley Povich Shirley Povich

Technical detail of ALL THOSE MORNINGS . . . AT THE POST ~ The 20th Century in Sports from Famed Washington Post Columnist Shirley Povich
Title
ALL THOSE MORNINGS . . . AT THE POST ~ The 20th Century in Sports from Famed Washington Post Columnist Shirley Povich
author Shirley Povich
ISBN 92654
Language
Category Entertainment & Sports
Publisher PublicAffairs
Pages 405
Publishing Date 1st January, 1970

Book Reviews:

Monday morning quarterbacking—and abundant more—from the adept Washington Post sportswriter.As Post readers already knew, Shirley Povich was about alike with the sports pages. Hired afterwards caddying a golf bout amid New York Post administrator Joseph Pulitzer and Washington Post administrator Edward McLean and actuality affably argued over, Povich went to assignment in D.C. in 1922 in that best allegorical of ways: “Go up to the burghal room,” an editor barked aback he showed up, “and acquaint Mr. Fitzgerald you’re the new copyboy he’s been allurement for.” Four years later, Povich was sports editor, and seven decades later, he was still at his desk, dying in 1998 aloof afterwards finishing a column. Povich (the ancestor of talk-show basic Maury) covered an amazing ambit of events, some history-making. One was the 1938 run at Pimlico amid Seabiscuit and War Admiral. Another was the 1924 World Series, in which, for the aboriginal and alone time, the Washington Senators won the title, acknowledgment to bullpen Walter Johnson, who, writes Povich in what seems to be knockoff Hemingway, “tried to amuse the crowd. So he threw his acceleration assurance with all the acceleration he could aggregation for four innings again he attenuated in the fifth inning because he capital to amuse the army with his acceleration balls.” Another was the 1936 Berlin Olympics, whose host’s antipathy Povich, the son of Jewish refugees from tsarist Russia, took pains to record: He cites a Nazi Party paper’s aloof authoritativeness that America could accept won no medals after “black auxiliaries,” again adds, happily, a agenda that Norway exhausted the Third Reich in soccer 2–0. Povich was aback in Germany for the 1972 Olympics, area he recorded the tragedy in Munich. Strong on actuality in the appropriate abode at the appropriate time—and in arduous longevity—Povich lacked the delivery and appearance of aeon such as Red Smith and Ring Lardner. But, as this brimming accumulating shows, he absolutely knew his stuff.He knew his readers, too: a absolute allowance for all those Washingtonians who absence account Povich over their morning coffee.

Shirley Povich was the Dean of American sportswriters. As a columnist for The Washington Post for more than seventyfive years, he was an eyewitness to the most thrilling moments in American sports, including: the legendary 1927 Dempsy-Tunney "long count"; the celebrated 1938 race between Seabiscuit and War Admiral; the 1946 signing of Jackie Robinson by the Brooklyn Dodgers; Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series; the Ali-Frazier fight of 1971; and the murder of eleven Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics. But Povich's columns were about more than sports; they reflected the dramatic changes in American society over the course of the 20th Century. Driven by a strong sense of social justice, Povich called for the integration of major league baseball in 1939, and twenty years later he was still at it, attacking Washington Redskins owner George Preston Marshall for having an all-white team. For the 100th anniversary of his birth, Povich's children— David, Maury, and Lynn — and his colleague at the Post, former sports editor George Solomon, have pulled together this panoramic collection of Povich's most beloved columns. The result is a front-row seat to the most awe-inspiring sports moments of our American Century.

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